Travelling through words and form: Maggie How

Maggie How

‘Creative Writing can certainly be learnt… we learn by doing it.’

Maggie How is a Lake District born author. She studied Interior Design and, by the end of her degree, her professor was already advising her to focus in writing about Design rather than designing itself. She started with poetry when she was a child and had been also experimenting with short stories and even a novel since.

Maggie’s first Creative Writing tutor was Gary Boswell.  She has done several Creative Writing courses and an MA in Creative Writing at Lancaster University. She’s currently doing another MA in Writing for Therapeutical Purposes.

As Sarah Jasmon, Maggie is a very active author who believes that writing is far from isolating. She attends to writing retreats quite regularly and belongs to several writing groups including the Brewery Poets in Kendal.

If you love experimenting with your words and learning all sort of forms in writing, you’re going to love Maggie’s story and advice!

 

What can you find in this interview?

-Doing a Creative Writing MA at Lancaster University.

-Experience in self-publishing.

-Experimenting with different forms of writing.

-Writing for therapeutical purposes.

-Experience in the publishing world

 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Maggie How. We had the pleasure to be her classmates during the Creative Writing MA at Lancaster Uni and learnt a lot from her. We wish you the best with your poetry – and we’re also looking forward to read your novel finished one day!

Poetry and laughs – Gary Boswell

Gary Boswell

 

‘I borrowed a book from the library called The Apeman Cometh thinking it was a joke book, and it was fun, I laughed all way through it, but then I looked at the back and it said it was a poetry book… and I thought, crack it!’

Gary Boswell left his job in bank to study art at Lancaster University. As a poet, he has been featured by the BBC and collaborated with artists from several disciplines. Want to hear his Scottish accent when reading one of his most recent poems to the TWL?

What can you find in this interview?

-Leaving your day-job to pursue your dreams.

-Collaborating with other artists.

-Being a writer-in-residence.

-How to read your work in front of an audience.

-Finding an editor.

 

Texts Read:

The Battle of the Trousers (poem).

 

Do you want to know more about Gary Boswell?

-Check out his more recent work, a collaboration with the painter Hideyuki Sobue to celebrate the 200th aniversary of Wordsworth’s daffodile poem.

-Check out this original recording of another of his poems, Ducks don’t shop in Sansbury’s.

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel, and the founder of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Gary Boswell, who shared his poems and enthusiasm with us.

 

 

Don’t forget to check our next interview on Sunday 7th of February in 87.7 Bailrigg FM at 6pm with the writer on a boat Sarah Jasmon!

Writer and sailor – Paul Atherton

Paul Atherton

Paul Atherton is a writer and a sailor. Do these two things have something in common? ‘On the water, there’s always something different happening,’ he admits. Also, his experiences on sailing helped him shape his first novel, Viking Voices, where he describes ‘a lot of movements of the vikings around the Irish Sea.’

Some authors find the promotion of their work especially challenging, but Paul has very good experiences. ‘I quite enjoy the commercial aspect of writing, I’ve built a good relationship with castles and Northwest libraries.’ He had book launches in bookshops such as Waterstones, and has also attended the York Viking Festival, where he was particularly succesful.

Paul feels a strong connection with History as a genre – Vikings and also the Second World War. Although he has travelled all over the world, he confesses that ‘I do my research by reading and speaking to people.’ His main tip to write Historical novels? ‘Reality can be stranger than fiction… if you’re writing something that is real but not believable you have to change it.’

What can you find in this interview?

-Experiences from doing a Creative Writing MA.

-Historical Fiction.

-Experiences with promoting books.

-Self-publishing.

-Sailing and writing.

Texts Read:

Billy’s War (novel).

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel, and the founder of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to our friend Paul Atherton, who was so kind that he even took us on a trip on his boat. You’re a wonderful writer and sailor.

Don’t forget to check our next interview on Sunday 22nd of November in 87.7 Bailrigg FM at 6pm with the Portuguese writer Leonor Macedo!

The NaNoWriMo Experience – Anne Cleasby

Children of Poseidon

‘You’ve published, your book is out there, but nobody buys it, it’s all about marketing.’ Anne Cleasby has already published the second book from a trilogy of Paranormal Romance – under her pseudonym, Annalisa Carr – and yet she’s very aware of the challenges that every published writer must face. She had been working as a crystallographer for thirty years before she decided to leave this job and move to the northwest of England to do a Creative Writing MA at Lancaster University. Although she admits that her professional career has also contributed to her writing: ‘I think Science can be quite inspiring for someone like me who wants to write Speculative Fiction and Sci-Fi.’

When Anne is not writing or petting her three lovely cats, she likes attending literary events or practice sports. ‘Running in the morning wakes me up and gets me ready to start other things.’ Going through NaNoWriMo encouraged her to get her writing out there. ‘It gives you deadlines and motivation and something to aim towards.’ There, she wrote what would turn into her first published book, and now she is seriously considering the possibility of making a living from her words.

What can you find in this interview?
-Experiences on working and writing at the same time.
-Tips about how to find an agent and publish.
-Speculative Fiction and Science-Fiction.
NaNoWriMo.
-Literary life in the Northwest

Texts read:
Living and Loving dangerously. (Short story).

Writing resources mentioned:
NaNoWriMo.

Do you want to know more about Anne Cleasby?
-Check out his book collection Children of Poseidon.

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel, and the founder of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to our lovely friend Anne Cleasby with whom we had the privilege to do the Creative Writing MA at Lancaster University. We are eagerly waiting for your Sci-Fi novel to be published!

Don’t forget to check our next interview on Sunday 8th of November in 87.7 Bailrigg FM at 6pm with Yamuna Venugopal!