Getting Into The Writer’s Head: Natasha Robson

Natasha Robson

‘Editing involves trying to get into the head of the writer and bringing out the best of what’s already there.’

Natasha Robson is an assistant editor at Holland House Books, an indie publishing house – like Sam Jordison‘s Galley Beggar Press. She has contributed to the Novella Project from the very beginning – a project which gives unknown authors that come from very different backgrounds the possibility of publishing  exciting fiction for the very first time.*

Natasha is doing an MA in Literature in the University of Reading. That and her love of teaching made her took the path of editing, and she couldn’t be more enthusiastic about it – helping authors to tell the stories they want.

Also, like the writer Sarah Jasmon, she’s living a boat, and we wonder, is there something linked between living on water and creativity? Who knows…

If you want to know more about the Novella Project please check out their page, they are doing something wonderful, daring and unique!

What can you find in this interview?

-Working as an editor.

-Information about indie publishing houses such as Holland House Books.

-The editing process.

-Publishing projects.

 

 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Natasha Robson, who is a truly thoughtful editor! We wish you the best in this adventure, we’re sure you’ll keep editing great books!

 

*And I have the pleasure to say I am among these authors! My gothic horror novella McTavish Manor will be ouy in October 2016.

 

The Harpist Writer: Beth Cortese

beth book photo

‘With the creative writing I don’t have the fear of the blank page… I like to write…  I’d just get something done and then I go from there…’

Beth is English Literature PhD student, author of two children novels, poetry performer harpist player… and she’s not even 25! She started writing children’s fiction when she was still in highschool, and her prose is fresh and original (listen to her reading in this podcast and you’ll see what I mean!)

Her books Buttercup and her Many-Legged Friends and The Sharson Chronicles have been published by Rowanvale Books, funded by alumni from Lancaster Universty. Beth’s books can be enjoyed by kids and adults equally – and they are specially good if you, as I do, are deadly scared of hairy spiders and wasps…

What can you find in this interview?

-Doing undergraduate Creative Writing moudules

-Life of a English Literature PhD student.

-Performing poetry and doing literary readings.

-Working with an independant publiser like Rowanvale Books.

 

Do you want to know more about Beth Cortese?

-Check out her books in Amazon.

 

Text read:

And extract from The Sharson Chronicles.

 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Beth Cortese, who is my PhD pal and also an extremely talented writer. We hope you keep publishing and succeeding in both your creative and academic career!

Foldable Memories – Alexandria Meinecke

Alexandra

Photography by: Melissa Lewis.

 

‘Originally I wanted to write fiction… but it took one fiction class to realise I’m horrible at it… I can’t convince myself of the believability of the charcters in a story. With non-fiction, I don’t have that problem… it happened.’

Alexandria Meinecke came all the way from San Francisco to the small city of Lancaster to study an MA in Creative Writing. Her reviews had been publised by the Ignation Literary Journal and 7×7 magazine, but non-fiction is her preferred genre. Alexandria wants to renovate it by experimenting with formats… creating maps and even foldable designs!

What can you find in this interview?

-Writing for a magazine.

-Doing a Creative Writing MA.

-Writing non-fiction.

 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to  Alexandra Meinecke. It seems your books are going to be the non-fictional version of House of Leaves, and we’re looking forward to read them!

Adventurous Publishing – Sam Jordison

sam-jordison

‘I have mixed feelings with social media… I hope there is still a place for the writers that want to close themselves in the garage and write books.’

Sam Jordison knows well how to communicate with readers. He reviews books for The Guardian (what many would consider this a dream-job) and has set the famous Not The Booker Prize, which gives awards to books based on the preferences of the audience.  He also enjoys promotting unique talent through his own indie publishing house, Galley Beggar Press.

If you want advice on how to reach a larger audience or are curious about the secrets of the publishing world (have you ever thought about setting your own publishing house?) this is for you!

 

What can you find in this interview?

-Reviewing books.

-Using social media to promote your writing.

-Setting your own publishing house.

 

Do you want to know more about Sam Jordison?

-Check out his twitter.

-Check out his publishing house, Galley Beggar Press. (They have a short story competition!)

 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Sam Jordison, who kindly agreed to do this interview. He gave us a great insight into the publishinh world and also has put us in contact with many cool writers – you’ll hear about them soon! So thank you very much and we hope you keep discovering and publishing amazing authors!

 

 

The Renasssaince Writer – Rachel McCarthy

Rachel_mccarthy

‘We need the specialisations, but we could do with more cross-fertilisation between humanities and the arts.’

Rachel McCarthy has succeed in two fields that some consider the complete opposite: Science and Art. She’s a climate scientist and also a poet whose first pamphlet – Element – was praised  by the Laureate poet Carol Duffy. So for those who claim for an education that divides arts and sciences from a very early stage… this is an example of what people can be when they don’t have to decide between one and the other!

‘Writing is a very solitary act…to bear your soul on a piece of paper… and then stand up present it to everyone is kind of one of those nightmares.’

Rachel knows a lot about showing her art and performing in front of an audience, too. She co-hosted a radio programme when she was a university student and has been director of the Exeter Poetry Festival on 2013.

What can you find in this interview?

-Mixing Art and Science.

-Publishing a poetry pamphlet.

-Literature and Climate Change.

-Balancing work and writing.

-Engaging with the literary community.

 

Do you want to know more about Rachel McCarthy?

-Check out her webpage.

-Check out her poetry pamphlet Element.

 

Text read:

Two poems from Element (poetry pamphlet).

 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Rachel McCarthy who we had the pleasure to meet in the January Northwest Literary Salon at Lancaster. We loved your reading and became instantlly fascinated with your mixture of literature and science. We wish you the very best in your two careers!