Tucans, diamonds and Steam Punk: Oscar Delgado Chinchilla.

OscarDS

‘I’ve just started thinking about Creative Writing as a career…’

Oscar studied English Literature in Costa Rica. When he was allowed to hand in a creative writing piece instead of just a critical essay as a final assingment for his MA course, he discovered that fiction could be his passion as well as his talent. Since then, he has published his short stories in several magazines and eventually came to Lancaster to do the Creative Writing MA. Now he’s a Creative Writing PhD student in the University of Nottingham. He admits to find more natural writing in English than in Spanish – his first language – as he says he can be more honest when he’s not using his mother tongue.

Oscar is interested in Gothic, Fantasy, Sci-Fi and Speculative Fiction, among others. Read  Like Diamonds in her Eyes* to see how he skillfully mixes Sci-Fi with Comedy just as another great writer we interviewed here, Eddie Robson. Oscar could also be the pioneer of a new genre, Tropical Horror, that blends Gothic with the rich imagery of Costa Rica.

 

*Fun fact: The main character in this story is named after our dear secretary in the English Lit and Creative Writing Department at Lancaster, Leila!

What can you find in this interview?

-Doing a Creative Writing MA at Lancaster University.

-Publishing in magazines such as Fiction Magazines.

-Sci-Fi, Fantasy, Gothic, Steam Punk and Speculative Fiction.

-Writing in a second language.

-Travelling and writing.

-Multiculturalism.

 

Do you want to know more about Oscar Delgado Chinchilla?

-Check out his short story Like Diamonds in her Eyes published in Nebula Rift.
-Check out his publications in Revista de Lenguas Modernas.


 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to  Oscar Delgado Chinchilla. He was our writing pal in the CW MA at Lancaster and our dear friend. You might have traumatised us for life by using tucans in a horror story but are still very proud of all your achievements and hope to read your novels soon!

Travelling through words and form: Maggie How

Maggie How

‘Creative Writing can certainly be learnt… we learn by doing it.’

Maggie How is a Lake District born author. She studied Interior Design and, by the end of her degree, her professor was already advising her to focus in writing about Design rather than designing itself. She started with poetry when she was a child and had been also experimenting with short stories and even a novel since.

Maggie’s first Creative Writing tutor was Gary Boswell.  She has done several Creative Writing courses and an MA in Creative Writing at Lancaster University. She’s currently doing another MA in Writing for Therapeutical Purposes.

As Sarah Jasmon, Maggie is a very active author who believes that writing is far from isolating. She attends to writing retreats quite regularly and belongs to several writing groups including the Brewery Poets in Kendal.

If you love experimenting with your words and learning all sort of forms in writing, you’re going to love Maggie’s story and advice!

 

What can you find in this interview?

-Doing a Creative Writing MA at Lancaster University.

-Experience in self-publishing.

-Experimenting with different forms of writing.

-Writing for therapeutical purposes.

-Experience in the publishing world

 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Maggie How. We had the pleasure to be her classmates during the Creative Writing MA at Lancaster Uni and learnt a lot from her. We wish you the best with your poetry – and we’re also looking forward to read your novel finished one day!

Exploring the writing universe: Eddie Robson.

Eddie Robson

‘We had our first child so I quit job so I could be more flexible… that also gave the opportunity to write, it did mean that when I got the time to write I was ready to use it.’

Eddie Robson has written in all forms of media: from his successful BBC sitcom Welcome To Our Village, Please Invade Carefully to books about Film Noir and his Sci-Fi debut novel Tomorrow Never Knows. Doing a MA in Creative Writing made him take this path more seriously. Eddie finished his Sci-Fi novel while taking care of his children at home and is now working on a second one.

Eddie Robson is also a very, very friendly writer. When I bought his book at a Sci-Fi convention he gave me a biscuit – a super tasty one, and for those who know me, biscuits are my only true love. Please, go out and buy Eddie’s book – it’s as delightful as his home-made biscuits, I promise. Or you can also meet him in person this Friday 18th of March in Lancaster LitFest!

If you want to get into freelance writing or radio, or if you’re trying to publish your first novel you cannot miss Eddie‘s encouraging story!

 

 

What can you find in this interview?

-Doing a Creative Writing MA at Goldsmith University.

-Publishing Sci-Fi with Snowbooks. (Currently open to submissions).

-Balancing writing and parenting.

-Freelancing.

-Working for the BBC. Check their Writer’s Room!

Texts Read:

Tomorrow Never Knows (Sci-Fi novel, extract).

Do you want to know more about Eddie Robson?

-Check out his twitter.

-Check out Wikipedia page.

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Eddie Robson. We hope to read more of your novels, just one is not enough!

 

 

How writing can save your life: Michael Womack

Michael Womack

‘I’m not really doing it for the money, it’s something I’m passionate about…’

Michael Womack revindicates the importance of how we positively impact on others with our writing instead of measuring our success just with money. In his own words, there’s no better recipe for disappointment than doing the latter.

Michael started writing poetry in highschool. He joined the USA army and fought in Iraq. Back in Georgia he struggled with post traumatic stress disorder and depression. His first novel, From a Soldier’s Perspective, was inspired in his personal experiences. He is also the author of a poetry collection called Sexual Intimacy, Beyond Pleasure.

Listen to Michael‘s honest advice on how important is to feel passionate about your writing, because it can literally save your life!

What can you find in this interview?

-Using writing to overcome traumatic experiences.

-Self-publishing.

-Advantages of publishing in e-Book formart.

-Poetry.

-War experiences.

Texts Read:

From a Soldier’s Perspective  (extract).

Do you want to know more about Michael Womack?

-Check out his twitter.

-Check out his FB page.

-Check out his blog.

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel and to the founder and sponsor of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Michael Womack, who kindly agreed to be interviewed even if he lives in the other side of the Atlantic… we wish you the best in your literary career!