Throwing darts – Kirsty Logan

Kirsty Logan

‘While we write we’ve to fool ourselves that no one would ever read it’. This might be Kirsty Logan‘s fantasy, but the truth is she has been able to engage with quite a large audience, especially since her debut novel, The Gracekeepers, was published this year. ‘A novel is like a doll house. A huge world you can look at and explore.’ Kirsty also enjoys writing short stories – she has two collections out there, The Rental Heart and A Portable Shelter. ‘A short story is like looking through a keyhole: they’re small but suggest a much larger world.’

Kirsty is a very active writer. She found her agent through Twitter: ‘If you’re not on twitter as a writer, get on Twitter.’ She also participates in the WoMentoring project, as ‘it keeps me on my toes because I see the talent out there’ and travels to fascinating places – from the Scottish’s shores to Iceland – to gather inspiration for her stories. Her secret? Working little by little, ‘If I do 400 words in the morning it doesn’t matter what happens with the rest of the day’, and not getting discouraged easily. ‘Getting published or getting an agent is like throwing darts in a dartboard, not knowing which one is going to hit the bull’s eye.’

What can you find in this interview?

-Experiences in getting an agent and getting published.

-Ideas to publish a short story collection.

-Travelling to research your writing.

-Characterisation.

-Writing routine.

-Animals in literature.

Texts Read:

The Gracekeepers (novel).

Writing Resources:

WoMentoring.

Do you want to know more about Kirsty Logan?

-Check out her website.

-Check out her Twitter.

-Check out her Instagram.

-Check out her Facebook.

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel, and the founder of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Kirsty Logan, who has been very kind in accepting to be interviewed by TWL. We hope to read lots of your novels!

Don’t forget to check our next interview on Sunday 6th of December in 87.7 Bailrigg FM at 6pm with Weird Fiction writer Tim Jarvis!

 

 

East and West writer – Leonor Macedo

Leonor Macedo
Leonor Macedo is fluent in two languages – Portuguese and English – and even understood a bit of Cantonese when she was a child. The story of her infancy is fascinating. ‘I lived in Macao since I was 2, coming back to Portugal at 10 was more like going to a different country than coming home.’ English is the language she chose to write her stories: ‘I write in English to reach a larger audience, the Portuguese publishing industry is not very developed. I also love the language.’ She confesses to be inspired mainly by English authors such as Neil Gaiman, although, as she points out, ‘there are Portuguese writers that write in English as well, like Pessoa.’ (Check an interesting article about this unique poet here!)
Leonor finds inspiration in cultures from remote places, such as Japan. She’s also an enthusiast role player, and she admits that ‘role playing helped me develop characters for my writing.’ Is this perhaps something that more writers should consider?
She’s currently doing the second year of the Distance Learners MA in Creative Writing at Lancaster University. ‘The CW MA at Lancaster Uni has opened my understanding of what it is to write and how to write.’ As Gabriella Campbell – another TWL author – she also likes to keep a daily writing routine ‘I force myself to write at least 200 or 500 words every day.’ 

 

What can you find in this interview?

-Experiences from doing a Distance Learners Creative Writing MA.

-How role-playing can help you to create believable characters.

-How to use DeviantArt as a writer.

-Travelling and writing.

Texts Read:

–Extract from an untitled Fantasy novel.

Do you want to know more about Leonor Macedo?

-Check out her Deviantart, where you can also have ask her for a literary commission!

 

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel, and the founder of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to Leonor Macedo, who is our fellow student in the Creative Writing MA here at Lancaster University. We hope you are enjoying it as much as we did!

Don’t forget to check our next interview on Sunday 29th of November in 87.7 Bailrigg FM at 6pm with the Scottish writer Kirsty Logan!

 

Writer and sailor – Paul Atherton

Paul Atherton

Paul Atherton is a writer and a sailor. Do these two things have something in common? ‘On the water, there’s always something different happening,’ he admits. Also, his experiences on sailing helped him shape his first novel, Viking Voices, where he describes ‘a lot of movements of the vikings around the Irish Sea.’

Some authors find the promotion of their work especially challenging, but Paul has very good experiences. ‘I quite enjoy the commercial aspect of writing, I’ve built a good relationship with castles and Northwest libraries.’ He had book launches in bookshops such as Waterstones, and has also attended the York Viking Festival, where he was particularly succesful.

Paul feels a strong connection with History as a genre – Vikings and also the Second World War. Although he has travelled all over the world, he confesses that ‘I do my research by reading and speaking to people.’ His main tip to write Historical novels? ‘Reality can be stranger than fiction… if you’re writing something that is real but not believable you have to change it.’

What can you find in this interview?

-Experiences from doing a Creative Writing MA.

-Historical Fiction.

-Experiences with promoting books.

-Self-publishing.

-Sailing and writing.

Texts Read:

Billy’s War (novel).

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel, and the founder of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to our friend Paul Atherton, who was so kind that he even took us on a trip on his boat. You’re a wonderful writer and sailor.

Don’t forget to check our next interview on Sunday 22nd of November in 87.7 Bailrigg FM at 6pm with the Portuguese writer Leonor Macedo!

Feeling and writing – Yamuna Venugopal

Yamuna photo

‘I grew up in a household where female members of the neighbourhood came to talk with my parents about injustices,’ Yamuna Venugopal said. She’s an courageous writer who left a stable job as a software engineer to come to Lancaster and study a Creative Writing MA. She hasn’t regretted this decision, though: ‘Being away from India gave me a broad-minded view of the things I’m writing about.’

Yamuna is a skilled writer who likes to address Indian social reality through her short stories, often told from a female perspective. ‘I like to write about something that affects me.’ For her, the most important thing in writing is to depict believable characters: ‘I try to be in someone else’s skin when I write, it keeps me emotionally close to the character.’ One of her short stories was published in Pif Magazine. After completing her MA, Yamuna returned to India, where she’s currently pursuing a career in writing. ‘I’d love to have an international audience,’ she confesses.

What can you find in this interview?

-Experiences from doing a Creative Writing MA.

-Socially engaged writing.

-Experiences with publishing in online magazines.

-Blogging.

-Writing in a second language.

Texts Read:

Abstract Art (short story).

Do you want to know more about Yamuna Venugopal?

-Check out her blog.

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel, and the founder of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to our talented writer and friend Yamuna Venugopal. We’re sure your books are going to reach an audience from all over the world!

Don’t forget to check our next interview on Sunday 15th of November in 87.7 Bailrigg FM at 6pm with sailor and writer Paul Atherton!

The NaNoWriMo Experience – Anne Cleasby

Children of Poseidon

‘You’ve published, your book is out there, but nobody buys it, it’s all about marketing.’ Anne Cleasby has already published the second book from a trilogy of Paranormal Romance – under her pseudonym, Annalisa Carr – and yet she’s very aware of the challenges that every published writer must face. She had been working as a crystallographer for thirty years before she decided to leave this job and move to the northwest of England to do a Creative Writing MA at Lancaster University. Although she admits that her professional career has also contributed to her writing: ‘I think Science can be quite inspiring for someone like me who wants to write Speculative Fiction and Sci-Fi.’

When Anne is not writing or petting her three lovely cats, she likes attending literary events or practice sports. ‘Running in the morning wakes me up and gets me ready to start other things.’ Going through NaNoWriMo encouraged her to get her writing out there. ‘It gives you deadlines and motivation and something to aim towards.’ There, she wrote what would turn into her first published book, and now she is seriously considering the possibility of making a living from her words.

What can you find in this interview?
-Experiences on working and writing at the same time.
-Tips about how to find an agent and publish.
-Speculative Fiction and Science-Fiction.
NaNoWriMo.
-Literary life in the Northwest

Texts read:
Living and Loving dangerously. (Short story).

Writing resources mentioned:
NaNoWriMo.

Do you want to know more about Anne Cleasby?
-Check out his book collection Children of Poseidon.

Many thanks to our meticulous editor, Terry Garanhel, and the founder of the programme, Yvonne Battle-Felton. And, of course, to our lovely friend Anne Cleasby with whom we had the privilege to do the Creative Writing MA at Lancaster University. We are eagerly waiting for your Sci-Fi novel to be published!

Don’t forget to check our next interview on Sunday 8th of November in 87.7 Bailrigg FM at 6pm with Yamuna Venugopal!